Below are a few MARS videos highlighting different marine animal emergencies and responses from 2017:

 

MARS Right Whale Incident Report

Today, MARS and the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, released the final report detailing the 2017 right whale incidents and necropsy results in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It was confirmed that most of the animals examined died due to human activities. We hope the information provided in this report will guide conservation efforts, as well as industry, to better protect this endangered species.

We’d like to thank the many contributors to the report, those who helped facilitate response and the many, many volunteers who helped us conduct the monumental task of seven necropsies.

The full report can be found at here.

 

Beached Bottlenose Dolphin in the Shubenacadie River, Nova Scotia

On May 7th, a dead bottlenose dolphin was reported on the shoreline of the Shubenacadie River, near South Maitland in Nova Scotia. While we have received reports of a few other stranded bottlenose dolphins in Nova Scotia in the past, it is uncommon to see them.

A field assessment of the carcass confirmed it to be an nearly 10ft adult female. Working against the extreme tides of the Bay of Fundy, measurements were taken and an on site necropsy was performed by MARS staff. While collecting samples, the necropsy also revealed the dolphin to be pregnant with a near full-term fetus. However, the cause of death has not yet been determined.

 

Large dead baleen whale near Liverpool, NS

On May 2nd, a large dead baleen whale was reported beached near Liverpool, NS. A field assessment of the carcass confirmed it is the same blue whale that was sighted in April off NS, and previously off Newfoundland in March. Measurements and additional samples of skin and baleen were taken. We’re currently working with DFO and other partners to determine if a necropsy is possible so we can try to figure out what happened to this young female.

While this is an amazing animal that people may want to visit, we do want to remind everyone that this is a federally protected species under the Species At Risk Act and it is illegal to disturb the carcass or remove any parts. Feel free to look but please do not touch!

 
 

For a full list of MARS response videos, please click here.